Profile: Emma Goode (Geologist, Tarmac Trading Ltd.)

Emma Goode
Name:
 Emma Goode

Job Role: Geologist – Land and Natural Resources Function 

Organisation: Tarmac Trading Limited a CRH company.

Education Background: BSc Earth System Science at Keele University.


1. What inspired you to take up a career in the Geosciences?

A levels options at my school only included Geography, unlike some other facilities that also offered Geology, therefore I ended up choosing as broad a degree in Earth Science as I could find as I wasn’t sure I would enjoy the geology part as much as the Geography or the Chemistry aspects.

It ended up that I enjoyed the geological part of the degree the most as it was diverse and fascinating. I completed my Earth Science degree doing my dissertation on the volcanoes in Iceland.

 2. What does your current job role involve?

I work as a geologist based in the ‘South Tarmac region’ meaning that as part of a regional team we cover the entire area of England approximately south of Leicester.

For me personally that means I am responsible for the geological work at 17 active quarry units, several dormant and ongoing Greenfield projects.

I do the Site investigation management, Geological Modelling and Reserve Calculations in a 3D Computer package called LSS, and ensure all my units comply with the Geotechnical Safety requirements set out by the HSE Quarry Regs.

3. What do you enjoy most about your job?

It’s quite varied; I can be on site one day discussing a quarry extension with the site manager or on site with a drilling rig doing geological logging. Or the week can mainly be office based with the aim being report writing and geological modelling. It’s this variability that keeps this role interesting and challenging.

4. Why do you think it’s important to encourage more girls into the Geosciences?

Until recently I was the only female Geologist in our department of 15, times are changing and this is no longer the case but it has always been a male dominated industry.

It may be in part the perception that the quarrying industry is in some way ‘dirty’ and ‘rough’ but this is an old fashioned image. It’s a thriving, pioneering industry always looking for improvements and new technological advancements.

There are numerous opportunities to make your mark, have your opinions heard and basically drive change be it though industry like Tarmac or consultancy etc.

5. If you could give a piece of advice to girls currently thinking about a career in the Geosciences, what would it be?

If you are at all unsure about which particular sphere of Earth Science you are most interested in then pick a broad Geoscience degree with plenty of module ‘options’, you can always potentially specialise afterwards with a Masters or similar (just ensure that the degree is accredited with The Geological Society if possible).

Keep your eyes out for internships and mentoring schemes that may be offered with industry professionals and take note of the Graduate intake dates for the companies you are most interested in as they do slightly vary.

It’s also worth becoming a fellow of the Geological Society early on if you can find a sponsor as jobs are advertised and you can attend events to meet other Geoscientists.

Finally and ultimately, don’t give up if you don’t get into the perfect role straight away, sometimes industries and companies can be slow to respond and perseverance and flexibility can really help you get the foot in the door!


Find out more about careers in the Geosciences at our Girls into Geoscience event on 4th July.  Book your place today: girlsintogeoscience@plymouth.ac.uk  or Tel (01752) 585975.

You can also follow our event on twitter @girlsingeosci

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